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Inductive charging systems must be able to connect as many different vehicle types as possible with their heterogeneous receiver coils and battery systems to the charging infrastructure.
Inductive charging systems must be able to connect as many different vehicle types as possible with their heterogeneous receiver coils and battery systems to the charging infrastructure.
( Source: Finepower)

charging infrastructure On the way to the wireless charging infrastructure of the future

| Editor: Florian Richert

For e-cars to become a means of transport for all, it is first necessary to introduce a charging infrastructure suitable for the masses. The engineering company Finepower is developing a charging system that can charge the batteries of all vehicle types wirelessly because they are inductive, regardless of the manufacturer. The unique circuit technology ensures a high degree of efficiency - even without complex positioning with millimeter accuracy.

Inductive charging systems are currently a hot topic for developers in the field of electromobility. Charging systems must, therefore, be able to connect as many different vehicle types as possible with their different receiver coils and battery systems to the charging infrastructure. In the course of the project, Finepower has developed a prototype of an inductive charging system with adaptive compensation.
Inductive charging systems are currently a top topic for developers in the field of electromobility. Charging systems must, therefore, be able to connect as many different vehicle types as possible with their different receiver coils and battery systems to the charging infrastructure. In the course of the project, Finepower has developed a prototype of an inductive charging system with adaptive compensation.

Inductive charging systems are currently a top topic for developers in the field of electromobility. In addition to the charging infrastructure for electric cars, this also involves the contactless charging of industrial trucks. The challenge: Parameters important for wireless energy transmissions such as vehicle ground clearance, coil geometry, and positioning methods vary from manufacturer to manufacturer.
Charging systems must, therefore, be able to connect as many different vehicle types as possible with their different receiver coils and battery systems to the charging infrastructure. Such technology is of great importance for the electric mobility of the future. Politicians are also very interested in this technology and are promoting its development as part of the UnIndCha (Universal Inductive Charging) research project.

Electronics must compensate for variable vehicle position

The objective is not trivial. It is crucial to achieving a consistently high degree of efficiency even with very different vehicle positions relative to the inductive charger, while at the same time complying with the EMC limit values. To meet these conditions, the variable vehicle position must be compensated by utilizing an electronic circuit. For this purpose, an adjustable capacitance must be implemented in the primary coil circuit.

Batteries should also be charged during short stops

The scenario for the use of this charging technology envisages that vehicle batteries can also be recharged during short stopovers at service areas, supermarkets, or even at traffic lights. Situations in which positioning the vehicle with millimeter precision in relation to the inductance of the charging infrastructure would require too much time. The charging process should be started as quickly and efficiently as possible, with a large number of different vehicle types and with minimal communication effort between the infrastructure and the vehicle.

Measurements on prototypes with adaptive compensation

In the course of the project, Finepower has developed a prototype of an inductive charging system with adaptive compensation. Comparative analyses with methods without such compensation show that higher efficiency can be achieved with the Finepower system; with an extreme offset between vehicle and charging station, the Finepower system makes the operation possible in the first place. In the further course of the development project, Finepower will further improve and optimize the adaptive compensation circuit.

The application also conceivable in many industrial applications

In this way, Finepower makes a decisive contribution to making it possible in the not too distant future to charge electric cars wirelessly in many places touched by road traffic - in public car parks, train stations, airports, or supermarkets. However, the concept presented is not limited to automotive applications, but can also be advantageously applied in many industrial sectors, such as manufacturing.

EPCOS, TUM, and TNA as partners

EPCOS is involved in the project as a manufacturer of trans- and receiver coils for inductive charging systems and pays particular attention to the electromagnetic compatibility (EMC) of universal systems. Besides, the Technical University of Munich (TUM), the department of energy conversion technology, and the Kempten University of Applied Sciences and the Technology Network Allgäu (TNA) support original research work.

This article was first published in German by next-mobility.news.