The number of road deaths in the EU decreased by 43 percent between 2001 and 2010, and by another 21 percent between 2010 and 2018.
The number of road deaths in the EU decreased by 43 percent between 2001 and 2010, and by another 21 percent between 2010 and 2018.
( Bild: Unsplash)

Road Safety European Commission calls for KPIs for road safety

| Author / Editor: Erika Granath / Erika Granath

The European Commission calls for Key Performance Indicators (KPIs) for road safety to assist member states with the collection and harmonize reporting.

The number of road deaths in the EU decreased by 43 percent between 2001 and 2010, and by another 21 percent between 2010 and 2018. However, 25,100 people still lost their lives on EU roads in 2018. The same year, about 135,000 were seriously injured.

"This is an unacceptable and unnecessary human and social price to pay for mobility," the European Commission comments in a statement.

In May 2018, the European Commission put forward a new approach to EU road safety policy, the "Europe on the Move" package, together with a medium-term Strategy Action Plan. To transform the 'policy into action, the Commission recently launched a call for proposals to support member states in collecting KPIs for road safety.

Though it should be mentioned that the EU does relatively well compared to the global situation, it appears highly unlikely that the EU's current medium-term target, to halve the number of road deaths between 2010 and 20206, will be reached.

In the Staff Working Document: EU Road Safety Policy Framework 2021-2030 – Next steps towards "Vision Zero," the Commission point out KPIs to be an integral part of its "Safe System" approach to road safety.

About 500 road deaths in the EU every week

"Road crashes are "silent killers", in that they often go virtually unnoticed in the public sphere, even though, taken together, they kill as many people – around 500 – as fit into a jumbo jet every week, in Europe alone. We do not accept deaths in the air, and we should no longer accept them on the road – the premise that no loss of life is acceptable needs to inform all decision making on road safety," the Commission wrote in a statement.

The Commission continued: "... we need to make serious inroads into this figure by 2030 in order to meet the EU's long-term strategic goal of "Vision Zero," i.e., no deaths and serious injuries on European roads by 2050."